Oh! The Places I’ve Been – “Z” is for ZERMATT


photo by M. Reynolds
photo by M. Reynolds

Of course I’d end up in Switzerland!

The name of Zermatt, as well as that of the Matterhorn itself, derives from the alpine meadows, or matten (in German). The name appeared first as Zur Matte (“in the meadow”) and became later Zermatt. It does not appear until 1495 on a map or 1546 in a text, but may have been employed long before.

There are no cars allowed in Zermatt. You can take a train, but once you arrive at the station, you can walk, ride in an electric car, or climb into one of the lovely-horse-drawn carriages

photo by M. Reynolds
photo by M. Reynolds

This photo, above, was snapped at Sunnegga, a ski area on the Rothorn mountain. As the name implies, there’s usually a lot of sun here. My sister, my mom, and I were here in the early 90’s.

The photo below is from Gornergrat, at 3,089 meters above sea level, March 2007. Yes, the air is thin, but look at this view!

photo by M. Reynolds
photo by M. Reynolds

Honorable mentions go to Zurich (where our dear friends Paul and Athena reside and have welcomed us), Zug, and Zweisimmen. “Z” was easy!

Thanks for following this blog during the April A to Z Blogging Challenge. I hope you enjoyed visiting some of the places that are part of my travel history.

Chill Out


It’s really hot here (I know, it’s hot everywhere, and we’re fortunate to at least get rain every now and then).  Too hot for a post, and besides, I’m in my final edits now, so instead, I’ll simply share a photograph that I took in March 2007.  This is Gornergrat, the last stop on the railway from Zermatt in Switzerland.   The summit is 3,089 meters, or about 10,134 feet above sea level.  Yes, the air is thin!  So gaze upon this picture and feel the cold.

photo by Martha Reynolds