Final Photo Friday


Well, this wraps up my little June project of Music Monday, New Word Wednesday, and Photo Friday. It kept me disciplined to post, but it didn’t take too much away from my writing.

This is Rhode Island. This is summer. This is our way of life.

Trawler. photo by M. Reynolds
Trawler. photo by M. Reynolds
Entering Old Harbor, Block Island. photo by M. Reynolds
Entering Old Harbor, Block Island. photo by M. Reynolds
Jerusalem. photo by M. Reynolds
Jerusalem. photo by M. Reynolds

New Word Wednesday


http://www.newport-discovery-guide.com/newport-ri-beaches.html
http://www.newport-discovery-guide.com/newport-ri-beaches.html

It’s the final New Word Wednesday and I’ve chosen to spotlight the word LITTORAL. No, not “literal,” although I like the way it sounds.

The “littoral zone” is the part of a body of water (sea, lake, river) that is close to the shore. The word “littoral” is used both as a noun and an adjective. It’s derived from the Latin noun litus, meaning “shore.” Synonyms include onshore, alongshore, coastal, and shoreside.

Rhode Island is known as The Ocean State, smallest in area and second most densely populated (New Jersey is first). It’s okay, though, there’s room for you to visit!

Rhode Island’s beaches line the 384 miles of tidal shoreline across the Narragansett Bay. We are, indeed, quite littoral.

Oh! The Places I’ve Been – “Q” is for QUONOCHONTAUG


Were you wondering what I’d come up with for the letter Q? Perhaps you were thinking Quebec Canada, Quincy Massachusetts, Queens New York. Yep, been to those places. Queensland Australia, Quimper France, Qatar? Nope, not yet. I chose Quonochontaug Rhode Island as my pick today.

Quonochontaug is actually an area composed of three small beach communities in Charlestown. Located between two salt ponds – Ninigret Pond and Quonochontaug, or “Quonnie” Pond – and their respective barrier beaches, the communities of West Beach, Central Beach, and East Beach house several hundred residents, some year-round, others summer only. Today, many houses are available as summer rentals. In the 19th century, Quonochontaug was a busy and fashionable resort of small hotels and boarding houses, and the popularity of the resort continued up until the Great Hurricane of 1938.

Quonochontaug used to be the site of an iron mining operation financed by Thomas A. Edison in the 1880s. Iron particles existed in the form of black sand on the beach and they could be separated out with magnets and melted to produce iron. The venture failed after cheaper iron was later discovered.

There are vacation rentals available in quiet Quonochontaug. Now, I don’t know these people, but you could rent an old-fashioned beach cottage (click to see). Isn’t it pretty?

photo by M. Reynolds
photo by M. Reynolds
photo by M. Reynolds
photo by M. Reynolds
photo by M. Reynolds
photo by M. Reynolds
photo by M. Reynolds
photo by M. Reynolds