#AtoZ 1968 – “Y” is for Yale


“You’re going to get a concept that maybe this really is one world and why the hell can’t we learn to live together like decent people.” ~ Astronaut Frank Borman, on seeing the entire earth from outer space as he and the crew of the Apollo 8 returned from orbiting the moon.

Yale

On November 14, 1968, Yale University announced it would admit women. Yale, founded in 1701, is located in New Haven, Connecticut.

Yale has graduated five US Presidents, 19 Supreme Court Chief Justices, and many living billionaires, as well as numerous heads of state. In 1793, Lucinda Foote passed the entrance exams for Yale, but was rejected on the basis of her gender. Women studied at Yale as early as 1892 in graduate-level programs.In 1966, Yale began discussions with its sister school, Vassar College, about merging to foster coeducation at the undergraduate level. At that time, Vassar was all-female and part of what was known as the Seven Sisters – an association of seven liberal arts colleges in the Northeast. The colleges – Barnard, Bryn Mawr, Mount Holyoke, Radcliffe, Smith, Vassar, and Wellesley – served as sister institutions to the Ivy League when the Ivy League still only admitted men. Yale introduced coeducation in 1969, and Amy Solomon was the first woman to register as a Yale undergraduate. The undergraduate class of 1973 was the first class to have women starting from freshman year.

Note: It cost $3,300 for the 1968-69 year at Yale. It’s a bit more expensive these days.

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BONUS MUSIC!

Here’s the #3 song from Billboard’s Year-End Top 100 Singles for 1968

“Honey” by Bobby Goldsboro

The Year of Living Minimally – Week Forty


This was a week for boxing up and carting items to The Salvation Army store in my town. Funny, but I had no emotional attachment to these things and was able to let them go easily. They’re just things!

Decorative and pretty, yes. But I haven’t used any of these items in years. Someone else might find a treasure, and that would make me happy!

My husband agrees that it’s time to donate the service for twelve (twelve! There are five of us left in our combined families) that was his mother’s. I think we used it twice in the nearly twenty-four years that we’ve been married.

It’s a lovely service, and I do hope that a family will use it.

We still have a lot of glassware and knickknacks in the top half of our china cabinet. Onward!

#AtoZ 1968 – “X” is for XR-7 Cougar


“You’re going to get a concept that maybe this really is one world and why the hell can’t we learn to live together like decent people.” ~ Astronaut Frank Borman, on seeing the entire earth from outer space as he and the crew of the Apollo 8 returned from orbiting the moon.

xr7 Cougar

The Mercury Cougar was referred to as a “pony car,” and like its mentor, the Ford Mustang, it was affordable, compact, and had a sporty or high-performance image. In the Cougar’s case, it was about performance. Available as a base model and the XR-7 shown above, it was a two-door beauty. By 1968, the Cougar had federally-mandated side marker lights and front shoulder belts. A V8 engine was standard on all XR-7s.

Comfort and performance options available for the Cougar included the “Tilt-Away” steering wheel that swung up and out of the way when the driver’s door was opened. And in 1968, a new option was available: a factory-installed electric sunroof. It was available on any hardtop Cougar, but rarely ordered on early cars.
(Source: Wikipedia)

 

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BONUS MUSIC!

Here’s the #4 song from Billboard’s Year-End Top 100 Singles of 1968

“(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay” by Otis Redding

#AtoZ 1968 – “W” is for the White Album


“You’re going to get a concept that maybe this really is one world and why the hell can’t we learn to live together like decent people.” ~ Astronaut Frank Borman, on seeing the entire earth from outer space as he and the crew of the Apollo 8 returned from orbiting the moon.

BEATLES

Its title isn’t really “The White Album,” it’s simply “The Beatles.” But it was their ninth studio album, and everyone knew who The Beatles were. The record was released on November 22, 1968, and its plain white cover only had the group’s name on it.

Most of the songs on the album were written in March and April 1968 in India. The Beatles returned to London in May to record the album, but there were problems – creative differences between members, and more notably, the presence of Yoko Ono (not yet John Lennon’s wife).

Most music critics wrote favorable reviews of the album, and “The Beatles” hit number one on both the UK and the US music charts.

Many (many!) have recorded what is my favorite song from the White Album, but here he is, Sir Paul McCartney, in a performance from Abbey Road Studio:

 

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BONUS MUSIC!

Here’s the #5 song from Billboard’s Year-End Top 100 Singles of 1968

“People Got to be Free” by The Rascals

#AtoZ 1968 – “V” is for Vietnam


“You’re going to get a concept that maybe this really is one world and why the hell can’t we learn to live together like decent people.” ~ Astronaut Frank Borman, on seeing the entire earth from outer space as he and the crew of the Apollo 8 returned from orbiting the moon.

Vietnam 2

It would be impossible to write anything about 1968 without including Vietnam. More than 3 million people were killed (including over 58,000 Americans). The war bitterly divided Americans.

The series by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick is worth watching, as it details the history (back to the end of World War II) that led up to the conflict, and has interviews with those who fought and those who opposed it.

By 1962, the United States military presence in South Vietnam had reached some 9,000 troops, compared with fewer than 800 during the 1950s. By June of 1965, 82,000 combat troops were stationed in Vietnam, and by November 1967, the number of American troops there was approaching 500,000.

Class was always the domestic issue during the Vietnam War, not communism. ~ John Gregory Dunne

Vietnam

By March 1968, Johnson promised to seek a peaceful resolution to the conflict. Peace talks opened in May 1968 but soon reached an impasse.

I covered the Vietnam War. I remember the lies that were told, the lives that were lost – and the shock when, twenty years after the war ended, former Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara admitted he knew it was a mistake all along. ~ Walter Cronkite

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BONUS MUSIC!

Here’s the #6 song from Billboard’s Year-End Top 100 Singles of 1968

“Sunshine of Your Love” by Cream

#AtoZ 1968 – “U” is for USS Pueblo


“You’re going to get a concept that maybe this really is one world and why the hell can’t we learn to live together like decent people.” ~ Astronaut Frank Borman, on seeing the entire earth from outer space as he and the crew of the Apollo 8 returned from orbiting the moon.

USS Pueblo.jpg

On January 23, 1968, the USS Pueblo, a Navy intelligence vessel, was engaged in a routine surveillance of the North Korean coast when it was intercepted by North Korean patrol boats. According to US reports, the Pueblo was in international waters almost 16 miles from shore, but the North Koreans turned their guns on the lightly armed vessel and demanded its surrender. The Americans attempted to escape, and the North Koreans opened fire, wounding the commander and two others. With capture inevitable, the Americans stalled for time, destroying the classified information aboard while taking further fire. Several more crew members were wounded.

Finally, the Pueblo was boarded and taken to a naval base in North Korea. There, the 83-man crew was bound and blindfolded and transported to Pyongyang, where they were charged with spying within North Korea’s 12-mile territorial limit and imprisoned. It was the biggest crisis in two years of increased tension and minor skirmishes between the US and North Korea.

The United States maintained that the Pueblo had been in international waters and demanded the release of the captive sailors. With the Tet Offensive raging 2,000 miles to the south in Vietnam, President Lyndon Johnson ordered no direct retaliation, but the United States began a military buildup in the area. North Korean authorities, meanwhile, coerced a confession and apology out of Pueblo commander Lloyd M. Bucher, in which he stated, “I will never again be a party to any disgraceful act of aggression of this type.” The rest of the crew also signed a confession under threat of torture.

The prisoners were beaten for straying from the compound’s strict rules. In August, the North Koreans staged a phony news conference in which the prisoners were to praise their humane treatment, but the Americans thwarted the Koreans by inserting innuendos and sarcastic language into their statements. Some prisoners also rebelled in photo shoots by casually sticking out their middle finger, a gesture that their captors didn’t understand. Later, the North Koreans caught on and beat the Americans for a week.

On December 23, 1968, exactly 11 months after the Pueblo‘s capture, US and North Korean negotiators reached a settlement to resolve the crisis. Under the settlement’s terms, the United States admitted the ship’s intrusion into North Korean territory, apologized for the action, and pledged to cease any future such action. That day, the surviving 82 crewmen walked one by one across the “Bridge of No Return” at Panmunjon to freedom in South Korea. They were hailed as heroes and returned home to the United States in time for Christmas.

(Source: History.com) 
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BONUS MUSIC!
Here’s the #7 song from Billboard’s Year-End Top 100 Singles of 1968
“This Guy’s in Love With You” by Herb Alpert

#AtoZ 1968 – “T” is for The Troubles


“You’re going to get a concept that maybe this really is one world and why the hell can’t we learn to live together like decent people.” ~ Astronaut Frank Borman, on seeing the entire earth from outer space as he and the crew of the Apollo 8 returned from orbiting the moon.

Troubles

In 1968, protests were seemingly everywhere, and Northern Ireland took note. A civil rights movement was started, and protests called for greater equality for the Catholic minority. The previous year, activists in Belfast drew inspiration from Martin Luther King and his civil rights movement.

The Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association demanded equal voting rights, fairer public housing, an end to ‘gerrymandering,’ and an end to discrimination in employment.

By 1968, the civil rights movement was beginning to gather support, and in August 1968, they were invited to hold a march in early October. A Protestant group announced plans to march the same day, and subsequently, all marches were banned.

troubles 3

On the day of the march, a few hundred civil rights protesters planned to walk from the predominantly Protestant area of Derry to the center of the city. Marchers were confronted by rows of police officers. The police used batons and a water cannon in an attempt to disperse the marchers and violent skirmishes broke out. “The Troubles” would last another thirty years, ending (most would agree) with the Good Friday Agreement of 1998.

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BONUS MUSIC!

Here’s the #13 song from Billboard’s Year-End Top 100 Singles of 1968

“Mony Mony” by Tommy James and The Shondells