The Summer of Princess Diana – Editorial Review


Sharing this editorial review for my newest novel! Get your copy here https://tinyurl.com/2w982w2v

Title: The Summer of Princess Diana

Author: Martha Reynolds           

Genre: Women’s Fiction / Coming of Age Fiction

Young American Diana Driscoll is looking forward to attending the London wedding of Prince Charles and Diana Spencer, courtesy of her wealthy Father. However, while on a stopover in Switzerland, she receives a phone-call that dramatically changes her plans, and not just for the Summer.

The Summer of Princess Diana opens with a short prologue set in 1976 before moving to 1981. This brief mid-Seventies opener sets the tone of the novel. It’s light, charming, and incredibly readable, while giving a sense of something a little deeper beneath the surface.

Diana is understandably spoiled and indulged, but Ms. Reynolds manages to make her likeable and interesting. Diana is aware of her lucky position in life, and the superficiality she exhibits during the early stages of the book never becomes too irritating.

Following the life-changing conversation with her mother, Ms. Reynolds is careful to realistically develop Diana’s awareness of her impecunious situation without the prose losing its frothy, slightly fun edge and jaunty pace. This skillfully maintains the narrative’s engaging style while subtly drawing out Diana’s hidden depths.

Indeed, Ms. Reynolds has an intrinsic knack for knowing when to leave well alone to let the reader exercise their imagination, or simply sail through with the story. Unpleasant issues are not exactly glossed over, but dealt with in a manner that does not ask too many questions, either of the perpetrators or the reader.

This approach might be viewed as slightly one-dimensional and it could possibly be argued that elements of The Summer of Princess Diana could have been explored with more insight. Nonetheless, this simplistic approach is refreshingly easy to read, cleverly thought-out, and deceptively well-structured.

There is an abundance of fine, descriptive detail throughout the novel which brings the characters and settings vividly to life. In particular, the Swiss countryside is beautifully captured and the seamless blending of the French language with its English counterpart adds complete ease and authenticity to the story.

Once Diana begins to live and work as an au pair with the Brusadin Family, the novel really flies while still keeping the airy, feminine touch to the writing and the sporadic brushstrokes of gently whimsical humor.

The dynamic between the Brusadins and Diana is delicately examined, yet the reader can keenly feel the vulnerabilities, tensions, and subtle power struggles that exist between them all in the Swiss farmhouse. Intrigue, apprehension, and poignancy simmer through this area of the narrative, which combined with the brisk pace, make the majority of The Summer of Princess Diana hard to put down.

Kenny, the Brusadin’s son, evolves from a prototypical, tantrum-throwing toddler to a somewhat pitiful little figure surrounded by foreboding elements. The motif of Diana’s brothers running in front of a car during the prologue, and Kenny doing similar, lends a continuity and possibly premonitory link between his life and hers.

From Diana’s first meeting with Monsieur Brusadin, he exudes mildly predatory behavior. However, it is with his friend, Luigi, that a particularly nasty incident with Diana occurs. This is given more emotional depth than other troubling moments in the novel, highlighting its impact and Diana’s subsequent maturity and growth.

Madame Brusadin’s portrayal is a masterclass in understated poignancy. Through the smallest of expressions and merest of mannerisms, she conveys a wealth of unspoken regret and disillusionment while still clinging to an ill-fated optimism.

The Summer of Princess Diana is a captivating read that navigates some dark issues with sensitivity and a lightness of touch. Reynolds has written an original and absorbing story with a sweetly satisfying ending and a protagonist who, despite her faults, never fails to appeal.

This Editorial Review was written by the Book Review Directory staff. To receive a similarly honest, professional review for one of your own books, click here.

Book Review Tuesday #BRT Darkness at Dachau


Darkness at Dachau

Darkness at Dachau is the most recent book from Paul F. Caranci, published this past October by Stillwater River Publications. It chronicles the story of Fr. Jean Bernard, a Catholic priest from Luxembourg who headed the international Catholic film bureau in Brussels, and was imprisoned in the Nazi concentration camp at Dachau from May 1941 until his release in August 1942.

Caranci is a meticulous researcher who provides supplemental information on the beginnings of Hitler’s rise, including the end of World War I and how Germany, and Germans, in humiliating defeat would seek revenge. He details Hitler’s poverty in childhood to his rejection from the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna to his affiliating himself with anti-Semitism.

The reader will learn that Dachau was the first Nazi concentration camp, opened in 1933, and that it was “home” to several thousand members of the Catholic clergy. In the case of Fr. Bernard, he was arrested and imprisoned for speaking out against the Nazis.

Fr. Bernard was unexpectedly released from the camp for nine days in February 1942. Released because his mother had passed away, Fr. Bernard was offered a ‘deal’ – that other priests might also be released if they would all publicly support the Nazis. Bernard refused and was returned to Dachau. Eventually, his brother’s intervention helped secure his permanent release in August 1942. Fr. Bernard eventually held senior-level positions in the Catholic Church in Luxembourg, and died in 1994 at the age of 87.

It’s important for me to note that there are many instances of extremely graphic abuse and torture detailed in the book. Some readers will find these descriptions too difficult to read and should be aware. Most of us know about the atrocities committed against innocent people in the Nazi camps. There are also very graphic and gruesome photos that Caranci includes, most of which come from the Holocaust Museum archives.

While this book is about Fr. Jean Bernard and his incarceration at Dachau, the last part of the book focuses more on other aspects of Catholicism (historical and modern-day), including “anti-Christian SCOTUS [Supreme Court of the United States] rulings,” church closures by church hierarchy in the time of Covid-19, the debate over offering communion to pro-choice elected officials, Roman crucifixions and stonings in the year 62 A.D., the torture of St. Luke in graphic detail, and Christians celebrating Mass in the catacombs. Caranci is a wealth of knowledge, that is obvious, and I believe he wanted to tie in various aspects of history, including the way priests at Dachau were restricted from saying Mass (“risking hunger, torture, medical experimentation and mass executions”) to the early Christians celebrating Mass in the catacombs in secret, but these instances pinball all over the place and seem not to belong within the scope of a book about a priest imprisoned in a Nazi concentration camp. Still, there is much to be learned from Darkness at Dachau, especially for anyone interested in the history of World War II.

You can purchase a copy of Darkness at Dachau at Amazon (https://tinyurl.com/2p9y6x56) or locally at Stillwater Books (https://tinyurl.com/2y4e3v5j).

Paul F. Caranci is the author of twelve books. He has been a student of history for many years. He is an incorporating member of the Association of Rhode Island Authors (ARIA) and a member of the board of the RI Publication Society.

Next book review will be Tuesday, January 25!

Coming Soon! Book Review Tuesdays #BRT


Image by LubosHouska/Pixabay

One of the things I want to do, starting in 2022, is feature more local books. Some of you know that we have a treasure of talented writers here in Rhode Island. Many of these authors are either self-published or published through small presses, which can limit one’s exposure. It doesn’t mean the books are any less. Maybe I should repeat that. It still infuriates me when I think back on the one traditionally-published author who told a friend (self-published) that she couldn’t be that good if she was self-published. Grrrr.

Anyway……beginning Tuesday, January 4, 2022, and going forward on Tuesdays throughout the year, this blog will feature a book from a local author. Yes, I still need to carve out enough time to write my next novel (it’s still mostly in my head at this point, but I know the beginning, middle, and end, so that’s something….right?!), and write and schedule my annual Blogging from A to Z posts in April, but I’m retired, and it’s winter, so bring it, I say.

Writers love reviews! Even the not-so-great reviews. I’m okay with them now, although the first time I read a one-star review for my first novel (“I couldn’t finish this drivel”), I cried. No more! Bad reviews, if accompanied by constructive criticism, can actually help one become better. Most of the time, however, bad reviews don’t say much other than “I couldn’t finish this drivel.” So move on. Keep writing, keep learning. If I truly hate a book (rare), or if it was obviously not edited or proofed (not as rare), I’ll keep my negative thoughts to myself. You will not see less than a three-star rating here, because I know what it takes to put a book out there. And it’s important to be kind.

And, I still believe each of us has a story to tell. So in between writing my 11th novel and chairing the next anthology for the Association of Rhode Island Authors and getting my April A to Z posts prepared, I will be reading and writing about what might very well be your next great discovery to read. Stay tuned and follow this blog!

It’s the holidays – joyous and celebratory for many, difficult for others. I will quote a lyric by the magnificent Stephen Sondheim, who passed last month:

Sometimes people leave you
halfway through the wood.
Others may deceive you.
You decide what’s good.
You decide alone.
But no one is alone.

A Bond Forever


Reprinted from an article in the Providence College alumni magazine, May 18, 2021.

The family tradition that is Providence College has been manifested over the decades in many and various ways. Generations of Friars have attended PC. (In my case: my dad John M. Reynolds ‘40, my cousin Kathy ’73, my sisters Ann ’78 and Mary Beth ’84, and me ’80. My husband James ‘79even though we didn’t know each other then, and his father Ray, also ‘79.) it’s a family tradition! Many of my classmates have sent their children to PC. For those of us who were students in the late 1970s, there is one event that has, and always will, define us.

To write about the Aquinas Hall dormitory fire of December 13, 1977, a tragedy that ultimately claimed the lives of 10 young women, prompts sharp and difficult memories. Memories of youth and innocence, of traveling back through time to golden days full of promise and hope. And in one night, much of our innocence and sense of invincibility was lost.

In 1977, there were no cell phones, no internet, no texts or Skype or Zoom. There was no Netflix or Hulu, no TSA at the airports, no ATMs, no AIDS. The Berlin Wall still stood, and Jimmy Carter was the president. There was great (and not-so-great) music, and if you were dining in Raymond Cafeteria, you might have heard Donna Summer singing about leaving a cake out in the rain at “MacArthur Park” over the intercom system. We wore clogs and Fair Isle sweaters, and we sported Dorothy Hamill haircuts.

Family and friends of the Aquinas Hall fire victims receive Holy Communion during a memorial Mass at the Cathedral of Saints Peter and Paul in Providence on Dec. 18, 1977. (Photo from Providence College magazine)

For many young women in the mid-1970s, going away to college was an important part of the rite-of-passage experience. A different state perhaps, a new dormitory adventure, and roommates! For some of us, the entire experience was unfamiliar. And daunting. But that’s how bonds begin. Everyone is starting out and going through the same unfamiliar rituals, to varying degrees. Few of us had cars, so our entertainment consisted of basketball or hockey games at Alumni Hall or Schneider Arena, tipping a few pitchers at the Rat, the occasional concert or lecture at ’64 Hall, or just hanging out in each other’s dorm rooms or in Mural Lounge, where the hot ham and cheese grinder was $1 and an ice cream cone was just a quarter.

There were three dorms for girls (which is what we were in those days): Meagher, McVinney, and Aquinas. Each dorm had its own personality, and all three buildings faced what is known as the Quad — a quadrangle of green space flanked by the three women’s dorms, plus McDermott Hall for boys. There were girls who met each other as roommates freshman year and stayed friends forever. And there were attachments forged through tragedy.

I’ve written about that December day, listing all 10 of the young women, even though I only knew two of them well enough to greet by name. But because we’re so connected, because we’re family, all of us, our Friar community is linked by the tragic Aquinas fire.

On Dec. 13, 2002, the 25th anniversary of the Aquinas Hall fire, Providence College dedicated an alcove in the new St. Dominic Chapel to the 10 women who died. They are remembered at a memorial Mass in the chapel each December. The Mass was livestreamed for the first time in 2020. (Photo from Providence College magazine)

When people die young, at the very beginning of their adult lives, one can’t help but imagine what they would have become, how their lives might have turned out. The 10 girls who died in the fire that snowy night will remain youthful in our memories.

Every year in December we stop to remember, because we can’t ever forget. When I return to the Providence College campus, I pause to look up at the fourth-floor windows of Aquinas and offer a prayer for the girls who perished, and for their family members. But I also pray for the girls who survived. One of those survivors told me that for many years, she tried to figure out why she was saved, what was her purpose. Was it her marriage? The birth of her child? She said it took decades to realize she was saved for many reasons, and she tries, even now, to understand. It’s a question that is beyond comprehension, she said. So she focuses on what matters in her life: kindness, expressing to loved ones how much they mean, letting go of anger, cherishing friends.

All these years later and the memories can be as sharp as yesterday. That’s the thing about memory, even as we grow older. Now in our 60s, we often joke about forgetting the most meaningless things, yet none of us can forget the fire. I can remember a conversation with Katie, or the last time I saw Debbie.

Life is filled with moments — some so happy you’ll swear you must be dreaming, and some so tragic you wonder, for years, why they occurred. But if I can learn a lesson from my friend Kim, it is to find joy in small moments, to express kindness, and forgiveness, whenever possible, and to give thanks to the tightly knit community that is Providence College.

Martha Reynolds McVeigh ’80 ended an accomplished career as a fraud investigator and in the past 10 years has written ten novels. Her novel, Villa del Sol, was awarded the 2018 Book Prize in Literary Fiction by the Independent Publishers of New England.

Winners! Lots of Winners!


This was by far the most popular year yet for showcasing local authors! Wow, 40 authors featured in 30 days right here, and lots of giveaways, including some pretty big prizes. Thank you to everyone who participated – the authors who gifted their books, gift cards, even a virtual singing lesson! The followers who commented on every post, and I’m sure some of you were inspired to discover a new author – I hope so! We have a lot of talent right here in tiny Rhode Island.

So, here’s a list of all the winners:

Carolyn Duffy won my giveaway – a $25 Amazon gift card and signed copy of The Summer of Princess Diana

Elizabeth Devlin won Harle Tinney’s two-book giveaway: Belcourt Castle: Milestones and Memories and The Ghosts of Belcourt Castle

Alicia Haney won BJ Knapp’s book, Beside the Music

Cathy Kolpak won a copy of Mike Squatrito’s baseball memoir, Love Winning

Bob Ventrone won Mari Dias’s giveaway, a $20 Amazon gift card

Bonnie Karoly won Lisa Borges’s giveaway, a $15 Dunkin Donuts gift card

Audrey Stewart won Deb Zannelli’s giveaway, a $10 Amazon gift card

Thomas Silveria won a copy of Horizon from Tabitha Lord

Everyone who commented on Tom Rankin’s post won a download of his novella, Murder in the Limelight

Mike Berard won Paul Magnan’s book giveaway, a copy of The Coming of Dis, book 1 of Kyu, The Unknown

Deb Guyette won Risa Nyman’s giveaway, which included both of her books, Spooked by a Suspicion and Swallowed by a Secret

Connie Ciampanelli won Elizabeth Devlin’s giveaway, a signed copy of her novel Home Waters

Denise Flagg won a copy of Rhode Island Stories from Michael Fine

Sally Chetwynd won her choice of one of Lisa Jacob’s books

ankyno54 won a copy of Karen Petit’s Amazing Holiday Paws

Debbie P was the winner of Lorrie Manosh’s book The Feeling Closet

Helen Biancani won a copy of Belle DeCosta’s book Echoes in the Mirror

Tim Baird gifted a signed copy of The Dragon in the Whites and a signed copy of Good Night Phobos, Good Night Deimos to winner Carolyn Duffy

Julien Ayotte won Mary O’Sullivan’s book The Leader You Don’t Want to Be and its companion workbook

Angelina Singer gave away a signed set of her Rewind Duology and Joann Mead was the winner

Sue Brescia offered a copy of her gorgeous book The Year the World Stood Still and it was won by Karen Petit

Phyllis Calvey won all three of Portia Little’s small cookbooks – New England Seashore, The Easy Vegetarian, and Bread Pudding Bliss

Lori Tellier won a copy of Glede Brown Kabongo’s thriller, Our Wicked Lies

Bill Smith offered up all three of his children’s books, won by Leslie Piver

“RD” won her choice of one of Maria Guglielmo’s three books

Paul Caranci won a copy of D.T. Pugh’s thriller The Loss

Alicia Haney won a copy of Janet DeLeo’s book A Life Well Lived: Accompany my Father, a First-generation Italian American, as he Journeys Through the Depression, World War II, Fatherhood

Mary Catherine Volk awarded a copy of her book (winner’s choice) to Lori Tellier

Deb Guyette won a copy of Dana Ronci’s book The Fish and the Butterfly

Hank Ellis awarded a copy of A Perilous Journey to winner ankyno54

Audrey Stewart won a copy of Paul Lonardo’s children’s book The Goblin Pitcher

Hank Ellis won a copy of PK Norton’s Dead Drop

Apryl Scott gifted an Amazon gift card to winner Jennifer Huff

Audrey Stewart won Julien Ayotte’s giveaway, a copy of his book The Treasure

Debbie P won a copy of Paul Caranci’s newest book Darkness at Dachau

Karen Petit won a copy of Joann Mead’s novel Designer Baby

Alicia Haney won both of Coral Isabella Aurora’s books

Pauline Wiles won a copy of Debbie Tillinghast’s novel

Bonnie Gold won Elizabeth Splaine’s giveaway

Hank Ellis won a copy of Debra Westgate-Silva’s book Bethlehem Barn.

Now for the big prizes!

Cheer Up You Won Something Prize a $50 Amazon gift card PLUS you will have a character named after you in Tim Baird’s next book! Won by BONNIE GOLD

The Bonus Prize is a $100 Amazon gift card won by BONNIE KAROLY

And the Grand Prize, a $250 Amazon gift card, was won by LESLIE PIVER

Congratulations to all the winners and THANK YOU to everyone who participated in this month-long event – the fabulous authors and loyal readers. Happy holidays!

RI Authors Showcase – Meet Janet DeLeo


Welcome to the Rhode Island Authors Showcase! Each day in November, this blog will feature a different Rhode Island author. Read the post and leave a comment and you are eligible to win this day’s giveaway!

Leave a comment every day this month for over 30 chances to win either our Grand Prize (a $250 Amazon gift card), our Bonus Prize (a $100 Amazon gift card), or a Cheer-Up Prize (amount to be determined), just in time for holiday shopping!

A winner will be randomly selected one week after the publication of the blog post, and the Grand Prize and Bonus Prize winners will be randomly selected on December 7, 2021. For the daily giveaways, the author will contact you directly to coordinate delivery. Print books for delivery within the US only, please.

Janet DeLeo

After being a business teacher and an entrepreneur, Janet DeLeo found time to return to one of her first loves – writing. She started by writing poetry when she was young and then started writing anything that inspired her. She frequently started a sentence with the words, “When I write my book…,” but She didn’t know how serious she was when she blurted those words out. 

Janet also discovered a new love – painting. She now paints anything that doesn’t move. She also creates an endless array of items with glass. 

In no particular order, her current inspiration is fueled by three things: She is a Baby Boomer; she is a second-generation Italian-American; and she was six years old before she moved away from a little cocoon called “Federal Hill” in Providence, Rhode Island. That’s when she realized that everyone’s last name did not end in a vowel and that most men did not have funny names like LaLa, Slick, Blondie, or Bugs! She is also a proud graduate of a Catholic elementary school AND a Catholic high school. She is making a point that this background supplies her with enough material to write for the rest of her life! 

Learn more about Janet by visiting her website: https://janetdeleo.com/

Follow her on Amazon: https://tinyurl.com/3ma273ye

What a great title for a book! A Life Well Lived: Accompany my Father, a First-generation Italian American, as he Journeys Through the Depression, World War II, Fatherhood, … Patriarch in his First Ninety-four Years.  As Janet says, she met her father when he was twenty-three years old. She did not realize it then, but now she sees he had already packed a lifetime into his time on the planet. At ninety-four years young, he says his life has gone by in the “blink of an eye.” No matter how he or anyone else describes it, what a life it has been! It is the personification of the term, “a life well lived.” Walk the streets of Federal Hill. Savor the wonderful aromas wafting from the kitchens of the Italian immigrants. Watch as they develop strong families and help construct a new country. Appreciate them as they strive for and attain their share of the American Dream.

Janet will give away a copy of her book – a treasure for anyone with Italian ancestry, or anyone who enjoys reading about the past – to one winner. Just comment below and answer this question: What is your favorite Italian food?

Join us on SATURDAY, DECEMBER 11, from 9:00am to 3:00pm at the CROWNE PLAZA in Warwick for the 9th Annual Rhode Island Authors Expo!

RI Authors Showcase – Meet Portia Little


Welcome to the Rhode Island Authors Showcase! Each day in November, this blog will feature a different Rhode Island author. Read the post and leave a comment and you are eligible to win this day’s giveaway!

Leave a comment every day this month for over 30 chances to win either our Grand Prize (a $250 Amazon gift card), our Bonus Prize (a $100 Amazon gift card), or a Cheer-Up Prize (amount to be determined), just in time for holiday shopping!

A winner will be randomly selected one week after the publication of the blog post, and the Grand Prize and Bonus Prize winners will be randomly selected on December 7, 2021. For the daily giveaways, the author will contact you directly to coordinate delivery. Print books for delivery within the US only, please.

Portia Little

Portia Little is a feature writer and food columnist for Senior Digest, a columnist for Providence Vegetarian Examiner, and blogs at http://breadpuddingallday.blogspot.com/

She is the author of fabulous little cookbooks: Recipes, Roses & Rhyme; The Easy Vegetarian; New England Seashore Recipes & Rhyme; Lusty Limericks & Luscious Desserts; Finger Lakes Food, Fact & Fancy; Bread Pudding Bliss; Cooking with Coffee; and Spirit of America (in memory of 9/11). Portia is working on a gluten-free cookbook, to be published early next year. She has vast experience with that topic from cooking for her granddaughter, who has celiac disease.

Portia would like to give away all three of the cookbooks pictured above – one lucky winner will win all three! Just leave a comment below and tell us your favorite food. The winner will be chosen randomly one week from today and Portia will coordinate delivery directly with the winner.

Join us on SATURDAY, DECEMBER 11, from 9:00am to 3:00pm at the CROWNE PLAZA in Warwick for the 9th Annual Rhode Island Authors Expo!

RI Authors Showcase – Meet Angelina Singer


Welcome to the Rhode Island Authors Showcase! Each day in November, this blog will feature a different Rhode Island author. Read the post and leave a comment and you are eligible to win this day’s giveaway!

Leave a comment every day this month for over 30 chances to win either our Grand Prize (a $250 Amazon gift card), our Bonus Prize (a $100 Amazon gift card), or a Cheer-Up Prize (amount to be determined), just in time for holiday shopping!

A winner will be randomly selected one week after the publication of the blog post, and the Grand Prize and Bonus Prize winners will be randomly selected on December 7, 2021. For the daily giveaways, the author will contact you directly to coordinate delivery. Print books for delivery within the US only, please.

Angelina Singer

Angelina Singer is a young adult/new adult author with a romantic comedy, Just Like a Pill, books 1-3 of a dystopian science fiction trilogy The Upperworld Series, and both books of The Rewind Duology available for purchase on Amazon now – go grab ’em here! https://tinyurl.com/3ndpfr9s In addition to her writing career, Singer graduated Magna Cum Laude from Stonehill College in 2019, where she studied English, Music, and of course, Creative Writing. Angelina is a board member of the Association of Rhode Island Authors, managing their Young Adult initiative. She’s also a freelance editor and ghostwriter, often helping clients bring their literary visions to life.

In her spare time she enjoys crocheting (with a portfolio of work available for purchase on Instagram @asinger320 https://www.instagram.com/asinger320/), as well as mentoring younger music students at a local music store, where she has been studying guitar for over a decade. She views her writing as a way to simultaneously escape from and embrace reality.

Follow her on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/angelinasingerauthor

Instagram/TikTok https://www.instagram.com/angelinasingerauthor/ for exciting updates, exclusive content, and giveaways. Visit her website at https://www.angelinasinger.com/

And follow Angelina’s blog here! https://angelinasingerauthor.wordpress.com/

Angelina is giving away a signed set of The Rewind Duology (pictured above) to one lucky winner. All you have to do to be entered is comment on this post and answer this question: What one piece of advice would you give to your younger self?

Join us on SATURDAY, DECEMBER 11, from 9:00am to 3:00pm at the CROWNE PLAZA in Warwick for the 9th Annual Rhode Island Authors Expo!

RI Authors Showcase – Meet Mary O’Sullivan


Welcome to the Rhode Island Authors Showcase! Each day in November, this blog will feature a different Rhode Island author. Read the post and leave a comment and you are eligible to win this day’s giveaway!

Leave a comment every day this month for over 30 chances to win either our Grand Prize (a $250 Amazon gift card), our Bonus Prize (a $100 Amazon gift card), or a Cheer-Up Prize (amount to be determined), just in time for holiday shopping!

A winner will be randomly selected one week after the publication of the blog post, and the Grand Prize and Bonus Prize winners will be randomly selected on December 7, 2021. For the daily giveaways, the author will contact you directly to coordinate delivery. Print books for delivery within the US only, please.

Mary T. O’Sullivan

Mary O’Sullivan has over 30 years of leading, writing, and editing experience in the aerospace and defense industry. In each of her roles, she wrote entire sections of major defense-related proposals and business development material. Also, as a leader, she acted as a change agent, moving teams and individuals from status quo to higher levels of performance, through offering solutions focused on changing behaviors and fostering growth. She is also an experienced speaker and executive coach.

Currently, Mary is a weekly contributing writer to Rhode Island News Today, a daily digital news magazine. In addition, she regularly contributes her work to Providence Business News, as well as Arianna Huffington’s Thrive Global.

Mary is an International Coaching Federation Professional Certified Coach and a Society of Human Resource Management Senior Certified Professional. She is also a certified Appreciative Inquiry Practitioner and a certified EQ1-2.0 and EQ360 Practitioner.

In her leadership and executive coaching roles, Mary focuses on improving executive behaviors that impede high performance and enhance growth, such as soft skills, effective communication, and micro-bias awareness. She has successfully supported leaders such as attorneys, surgeons, pharmacists, and university professors, make career decisions that lead to success.

Her first book, The Leader You Don’t Want to Be: Transform Your Leadership Style from ‘Command and Control’ to ‘Transformative Visionary’ is now available at several Rhode Island booksellers and all digital bookselling outlets. Her companion book, The Field Guide, recently debuted on Amazon as a workbook to enhance the reader’s experience with the original book, offering practical, actionable steps to make a toxic workplace survivable.

Mary’s book is available at www.visionaryleaderbook.com where you’ll find a free download of the companion workbook. And you can visit her website here: https://www.encoreexecutivecoaching.com/

The book is based on the academic papers Mary wrote for her master’s degree and her university-based coach training, along with articles written for RINewsToday.com. Much of the subject matter is about Mary’s experience working in corporate America. She tells stories of the good, the bad, and the ugly side of working in large companies. Many are unbelievable stories you couldn’t make up (like chasing an original pen and ink signature because the reviewer refused to accept an electronic one. And the client was located in Spain! When the signature finally came in, the entire document was in Spanish.)  This story is but one of many Mary shares with her readers. Mary wrote this book to underline the perils and confusion of a bureaucratic organization and how people can easily get lost in the maze. 

Mary has generously offered to give away one copy of her book and the companion workbook. To be eligible, leave a comment below or answer the following question: What’s the worst job you ever had?

Join us on SATURDAY, DECEMBER 11, from 9:00am to 3:00pm at the CROWNE PLAZA in Warwick for the 9th Annual Rhode Island Authors Expo!