A Birthday Playlist


On the day I turned two years old, the Democratic National Convention nominated John F. Kennedy as its presidential candidate (he went on to win that November). The #1 song in the country was “Alley Oop,” by The Hollywood Argyles. Yeah, I don’t remember any of this. But here’s the song:

On the day I turned 12, construction started on the underground metro in Amsterdam. Apparently planning had been in the works for 50 years. I’ve been to Amsterdam, but I walked everywhere. More familiar to me was the #1 song, “Mama Told Me (Not to Come) by Three Dog Night. Here it is:

On the day I turned 22, I was a recent college graduate in search of a job. It was a slow news day. The temperature in Memphis reached 108 degrees. And the #1 song on the Billboard R&B chart was “Take Your Time (Do It Right)” by The S.O.S. Band. I loved this song! Here it is:

On the day I turned 32, Pima County in Arizona considered banning foam products like Styrofoam containers and coffee cups. “Dick Tracy” and “Die Harder” were in the movie theaters. And the #1 song in the country was “Step by Step” by New Kids on the Block. Travel back to 1990 here:

On the day I turned 42, HarperCollins and Warner Books had both bid $7 million for publishing rights to Jack Welch‘s biography. And the #1 song on the country charts was “I Hope You Dance” by Lee Ann Womack. Here it is:

On the day I turned 52, George Steinbrenner died at the age of 80. I remember standing at the entrance to a restaurant on that day, and the news was on a TV screen above us. I said to my husband, “Oh, Steinbrenner died. Well, he was 80.” Two old guys were in line behind us. One of them said to the other, “Hey, Steinbrenner died. And he was only 80.” The #1 song on the adult contemporary charts was “Need You Now” by Lady A. Have a listen here:

And so here we are. I’m 62 today. Yikes. The #1 song as of today (July 9) has been at #1 for the past 17 weeks. It’s “Memories” by Maroon 5 (appropriate!), and here it is:

Now you make a playlist!

Best Seller Repackaged


The-Way-to-Remember-kindle (1)

About four years ago, I wrote a book and called it Best Seller. It enjoyed some success and more than a few kind reviews. It was one of the nine novels I’ve written, and one of my favorites.

Last November, I received word from Amazon (where most of my books are sold) that they had a problem with the book’s title. They deemed it ‘misleading,’ and advised me that unless I changed it in a few days, they would remove the book from their selling platform.

Wait, what? What??? The book was up for sale for years, and now Amazon decides it’s got a misleading title? And by the way, it wasn’t misleading at all. The words ‘a novel’ were right beneath the title. And, in one of many telephone calls I had with staff at Amazon, I assured them that the novel had never achieved its optimistically titled status.

Didn’t matter. We emailed back and forth numerous times, and I spoke with as many as six different service agents, but the answer always came back the same. And a week later, poof! Best Seller, and all of its reviews, were gone.

Now, I’ve re-released the book. It’s got a different name – The Way to Remember is the name of the book the main character, Robin, is working on – and a new cover. The book’s contents are the same, with just some minor tweaking to, I hope, make it better.

For many of you who read this blog, you probably already purchased and read the book years ago, so I don’t want to trick you into thinking it’s new. It’s not, and the novel I’m working on these days won’t be ready until the end of this year (if I can finish it).

However, if I can find your old review (I was able to take some screenshots before it disappeared), I will be reaching out to you, asking you to post that review again. Because reviews are so, so important to authors. I’m hoping you’ll be willing.

Anyway, that’s my news for the middle of 2020. What a year, right? I hope you’re doing okay – physically, mentally, emotionally. It has been challenging, certainly for me on all of those fronts. Be well, stay safe, wear your face covering.

Ten Travel Photos


Oh, what a lazy blogger I’ve been. Well, maybe not lazy. Distracted. Discouraged. But determined. I’ve finally returned – somewhat – to my new novel, the one I’d drafted in January and February, the same one that was set aside for the past three months. Isolating at home doesn’t always lead to productivity.

Anyway, I was challenged by my good friend Vikki Corliss, of Brown Corliss Books, to post 10 travel photos over 10 days. I’m limiting my time on Facebook these days, but I did post to Instagram, so I wanted to share them here, for you. For this post, only the photos.

Heer Hugowaard, The Netherlands
photo by Martha Reynolds
From atop St. Peter’s Cathedral in Vatican City, Italy
photo by Martha Reynolds
Sunset, Corfu, Greece
photo by Martha Reynolds
Morcote on Lake Lugano, Switzerland
photo by Martha Reynolds
Eiffel Tower, Paris, France
photo by Martha Reynolds
Venice, Italy
photo by Martha Reynolds
Matterhorn, Switzerland
photo by Martha Reynolds
Hohensalzburg Castle, Salzburg, Austria
photo by J. McVeigh
With Abdullah the brass merchant, Fez, Morocco
photo by Martha Reynolds
Windsor Castle, Great Britain
photo by Martha Reynolds

There you have it. I had fun putting these together. The photos go back as far as 1978, and all bring back fond memories.

Be well.

Mothers and Daughters


Every mother-daughter relationship is unique. Complex. Some of these relationships evolve over time, if there is enough time to evolve.

My mom in Bermuda, around 1938

I looked up to her, then I didn’t. I resented that she was so strict – my friends’ moms seemed so much cooler. More permissive, certainly. By the time I got to college, I distanced myself – I could do what I wanted without her constantly looking over my shoulder. I was free to screw up as much as I wanted.

My parents on their wedding day, 1955

I asked if I could spend my junior year at the University of Fribourg in Switzerland. It was a program offered by my college, and many of my friends, all of us liberal arts majors, were going. Surprisingly, my parents said okay, and off I went.

On the day after Easter that year, my father died of a massive heart attack. My mother was a widow at 50. Three daughters – my older sister just out of college, me overseas and unreachable, and my younger sister still in high school. A widow at 50. Her parents were still alive. She had two brothers, but they both had their own issues. She was forced into doing all the things her husband had always done. Lawyers, accountants. Who will mow the lawn, service the car, pay the bills?

Mom around 1987, age 58

She learned to live on her own. Eventually her daughters moved out, she moved to a condo, and loved quilting. Her membership in the Narragansett Bay Quilters’ Association gave her purpose in her newly-single life. But she missed Jack every day.

Mom doing what she loved

It was around 20 years ago that my sisters and I noticed some changes in her behavior. She had no recollection of an event that we had participated in just a couple of years earlier. My sisters and I finally got her to agree to a test, and the diagnosis was fronto-temporal dementia. How cruel! This brilliant woman, who did crossword puzzles in pen, who taught me to love language and words, who majored in mathematics at Pembroke, was slowly losing her memory and cognitive abilities. I’m grateful that we, and my husband and brother-in-law, were able to surround her with love as she passed.

I think one of the reasons our relationship was a challenge (before I grew up and it wasn’t) was that we were more alike than either of us could admit. As she became more childlike with her disease, it fell to her daughters to be the caregivers, to mother the mother. We did, all three of us. We are Joyce’s girls, always.

Traveling through the Coronavirus


Image from Pixabay

Notice I wrote traveling through, not traveling with. Although I wouldn’t know if I have COVID-19, the Coronavirus. I haven’t been tested, I’m not showing symptoms, but yes, I could be infected. After all, I was in the midst of thousands of others this past week, at Boston’s Logan airport, Reykjavík’s Keflavik airport, Zürich’s airport, the train from Zürich to Fribourg. Then the markets and coffee shops and restaurants and stores in Fribourg. And, sadly, just a few days later, the packed train from Fribourg to Zürich, a flight from Zürich to Dublin, four hours in the jam-packed Dublin airport, six hours on the full airplane to Boston.

My little vacation and book research trip was cut short after president Trump declared Wednesday evening that, effective Friday, all travel from European countries to the US, was banned for 30 days. That’s what he said, what he supposedly read off a Teleprompter. (Yes, I know that Homeland Security later clarified it, but he’d already stated the mistruth.) I watched the speech, at around 2:00 in the morning in my hotel room, with a sense of dread. I was scheduled to be in Fribourg until Monday, 16 March. Under his directive, I would be stuck in Switzerland for another month. Now, you know I love Switzerland! But I couldn’t stay for a month. So, at 2:00 am Thursday morning, I began packing. I thought, just in case. I sent an email to my husband, letting him know I was awake and aware of the situation.

A half hour later, he called me. After a few choice words for Trump, he implored me to come home. “Do whatever it takes,” he said. “Don’t worry about the money. Just come home.”

By 3:30, I was dressed and packed. I sent messages to my friend Barbara, with whom I’d spent a lovely day on Tuesday, and to my friend Fabiola, with whom I was supposed to spend Saturday. I had friends sending messages to me. ‘Did you hear?’ ‘What are you going to do?’ ‘I’m worried about you.’

Fribourg train station
Thursday, 12 March 2020 5:45 am

I checked out of the hotel. Four nights unused, and although the guy at the desk said he’d look into it, I don’t expect a refund. I walked through dark and quiet streets to the train station (that brought back memories of my student days!), purchased a ticket from a smart machine, and rolled my bag up a ramp to track 3. The 6:04 train left on time – of course – and filled up at Bern, its next stop. Every time I heard someone cough near me, I pulled my scarf up over my nose.

I arrived at the airport by 8:00 and traveled up escalators to the departures area. When I inquired about where to find the Icelandair check-in desk, I learned that Icelandair doesn’t have a desk in the airport. (Note to self regarding discount airfares: sometimes you get what you pay for)

I was sent to FinnAir. I tried calling Icelandair and was told I was number 76 in the queue. After twenty minutes, I was number 72. I asked the woman at FinnAir if Swiss was flying to Boston that day. She directed me to another counter, where a very nice man looked up flights available Thursday to Boston. It was 8:30 in the morning. I was operating on zero sleep, one cup of coffee. I had last eaten at 4:00 Wednesday afternoon. He told me my best option was on Aer Lingus, Zürich to Dublin, Dublin to Boston. $1,397.00

I handed over my Visa card. The crowds at the airport, my understanding of exponential growth, and my intense desire to be home propelled me to the Aer Lingus check-in counter and down to the waiting area.

Both flights were full. Two women who had arrived in Prague on Tuesday and were flying back to Seattle, a nine-hour flight. “We had one day, yesterday,” one of them said. Four male college students on spring break, heading home early because their parents were “freaking out,” one said. When I defended the parents’ concern, they grinned and acknowledged it was the right thing to do. Most of the passengers, it seemed, were there because of the speech. Even the officials at passport control understood.

Only one time I was asked if I’d been to China or Iran. No one cared that I’d been in Switzerland, where there are nearly 650 cases and 4 deaths. That was on Wednesday. One day earlier there were only 500 cases.

I am home. My husband was at Logan last night to pick me up. I’d been awake for nearly 48 hours straight. I’m going to self-quarantine while I monitor myself. I hope others do, but many won’t.

Photo M. Reynolds

As for Fribourg, it’s been in my memory for over 40 years. It’ll stay there, even if some of those memories aren’t quite as sharp as they once were. And the book? It’s still going to be written. A self-imposed quarantine gives me plenty of time to write.

Everything Changes – Even in Fribourg


View from the Zähringen bridge
Photo by M. Reynolds

I knew it wouldn’t be the same, and I didn’t even want it to be. The first time I was in this medieval town was late September 1978, when I joined a few dozen classmates to spend a year abroad. Since then, I’ve returned to Fribourg a half-dozen times, so I’ve witnessed the evolution of this town.

Still, memory is a funny thing. Walking down the Rue de Romont, I can see in my mind’s eye the tea-rooms and cafes. A lot has changed.

Photo M. Reynolds

My favorite place on a Sunday morning, for a cafe crème and mille feuille has closed. Le Chasseur, famous for all-you-could-eat raclette, is gone. But there’s a McDonald’s and a Burger King. Indian, Japanese, Thai restaurants abound, a reflection of a more diverse population and the tastes of Fribourg’s newer generation.

Along the Boulevard de Pérolles
Photo M. Reynolds

I lived on the Boulevard de Pérolles, number 13, in a tiny closet of a room tout en haut. Most of the shops I remember from my daily walks are gone, with a couple of exceptions. The Rex cinema and tea-room are still there, the tea-room a throwback to a different time. And it still fills up at lunchtime.

I tried to retrace my steps to the Cafe Chemin de Fer, the gathering place for American students. It was popular because the owners, Marcel and Marie, welcomed us, as rowdy as we were. I turned down the Rue de Locarno, but couldn’t remember the way. How could that be? I should’ve known the route with a blindfold over my eyes. Well, forty-plus years later….

Anyway, I figured it out. Now, I knew the old cafe was gone. I’d heard there was an Indian restaurant there in its place.

Photo M. Reynolds
Photo M. Reynolds

Look at that! I’ll have to go there tomorrow for lunch.

Anyway, the Perriard and Le Chasseur may be gone, the Cardinal Brewery is gone, cars can no longer drive over the Zähringen bridge and there’s a new, modern bridge on the landscape. There are more cars, roundabouts, and still more building. But the cathedral stands, the Schweizerhalle is still operating, and Fribourgeois still wait on the curb for the walk signal, even when there are no cars in sight.

Photo M. Reynolds
On Grand’ Rue
Photo M. Reynolds

I’m Going


Fribourg, 2007.
Photo by Martha Reynolds

In late December, I planned a return trip to Switzerland, a place I’ve visited numerous times, the setting of four of my novels. I’m writing a new novel and it, too, is set in Switzerland, just outside of Fribourg. So this would an opportunity to do a little book research.

It would be a solo trip – our elderly dog has never been kenneled and we’re not about to start. Besides, I only planned on eight days. Wistfully, I’d hoped for longer, but it just wasn’t going to work this time.

Of course, the news at the top of the page these past days is all about the Coronavirus. Because it’s everywhere, even in Rhode Island. A couple of cases here, a couple of cases in Switzerland, too.

So what do you do? I’ve been walking around the house, singing “Should I Stay or Should I Go” – “Come on, you’ve got to let me know!” In the end, it’s up to me, at least that’s what my husband says. As of today, Monday, I’m going.

I’m careful. I’m aware. I’m living my life, and I intend to stay safe. And I’m going to a country where at least the people in charge don’t cover up the truth in order to make themselves look good. Truth is truth. Let the scientists speak.

Anyway, I’m flying out. I’ll post photos when I can. Stay safe and wash your hands.

Spotlight on my Happy Ever After series!


I managed to sneak in a blog post before the end of a January. Sorry for not being more consistent, but January finds me deep into drafting my new novel. And I write it out in longhand (with my favorite pen) in a spiral-bound notebook my dear friend Lynne gave to me. I’ve written twenty-four chapters so far – yay, me!

Meanwhile, the three books I wrote as my “Happy Ever After” trilogy are being featured on various book blogs over the coming weeks. This is a way to let readers who may not know me learn about my books, and there’s a giveaway of the trilogy as well. You can follow THIS LINK to find out about all the tour stops and enter the Rafflecopter giveaway.

Hey, if you know me, you know I’m big on giveaways. Belated congratulations to Geri C. in Indiana, who won my big December giveaway box. I’ll have another one coming up in the spring.

Like all indie authors, I could use more reviews on Amazon. Yep, you’ve read this before. But I’ll keep asking because it truly helps. Just a few words will do, and I’d rather have honest feedback, even if it’s critical. It helps me be a better writer.

Back to the new novel. The year is 1981 and the setting is…..wait for it….yes, it’s set in Switzerland! That means I need to go back and research. No, really, my husband insisted. So off I go in March to visit with my friends and refresh my memory. Expect this new novel in late November – I’m already excited about it! I’ll share more as the year progresses.

We’re living in uncertain times, my friends. Each day provides us with opportunities to be kind. I don’t want to miss those chances, do you?

A Decade of Writing


Happy New Year! And happy new decade. Wasn’t it just yesterday we were freaking out about Y2K??!

Ten years ago, on December 31, 2009, I was still working as a fraud investigator. My work environment wasn’t good, but it would grow worse throughout 2010 until I finally had enough.

We lost our little pug, Jessie, in May of 2009.

While we were dog-less, we took a trip to Lugano, Switzerland, in September that year.

Then by October, my husband indicated he was ready for another dog, and our little Cavalier King Charles spaniel, Bonnie, arrived in early November.

After I finally quit the job that was making me physically sick, I began writing my first novel in 2011. And here, on the final day of 2019, I’ve published nine novels and one non-fiction journal. And I can’t wait to begin my new book!

Thank you, all of you, for reading these blog posts, for taking a chance on an unknown author, for being a loyal reader, for buying my books as gifts for yourself and for others, for posting reviews, for letting me know that I write books you like to read! I am grateful, so grateful.

A December Full of Books


expo

Yes, the 7th Annual Rhode Island Authors Expo is this Saturday! Our biggest event of the year, the Expo features over 120 local authors in all genres – history, romance, mystery, science fiction, children’s books. Fabulous raffle items this year, free admission, free parking, and even Santa! If you’re in the vicinity, I hope you’ll stop by and say hello.

JINGLE VALLEY GIVEAWAY!

Next up – Martha’s big giveaway! My newest novel, All’s Well in Jingle Valley, was released earlier this week. It’s my 9th novel and my 10th book, and I’m so, so grateful to be doing this thing I love. All’s Well in Jingle Valley is actually the third (and final) book in The Happy Ever After series, which includes my 2015 novel A Jingle Valley Wedding and 2018’s April in Galway. While I hadn’t intended to write a trilogy, when I wrote the ending to April in Galway last year, I decided to weave the story into Jingle Valley. The first book, A Jingle Valley Wedding is discounted at Amazon (ebook) to just 99 cents for the month of December.

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So – here are the details to qualify for the giveaway:

  • If you pre-ordered the book prior to November 15, let me know in the comments (3 entries)
  • If you pre-ordered the book between November 15 and December 1, let me know in the comments (2 entries)
  • Post an honest review at the Amazon site before December 13 (5 entries)
  • Post an honest review at the Amazon site before December 22 (4 entries)
  • Share the book and its buy link on Facebook (3 entries)
  • Post a photo of the book on Instagram and use the hashtag #JingleValley (3 entries)

And what can you win?

  • ~ a black Eccolo journal with magnetized closure and a fancy pen to record your brightest thoughts (maybe this will be the year you write that novel?)
  • ~ an Almond Cookie gift set from Carol’s Daughter, featuring Almond Cookie Softening Body Wash, Almond Cookie Frappe Body Lotion, and Almond Cookie Nourishing Hand Cream
  • ~ a $10 Starbucks gift card
  • ~ a set of postcards from the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Massachusetts (Dalton, Massachusetts is practically next door!)
  • ~ a small box of maple sugar candy from Stockbridge
  • ~ a Vera Bradley zip ID case in Romantic Paisley
  • ~ and of course, a signed copy of All’s Well in Jingle Valley with a fabulous BookFlip bookmark
  • ~ and there may be a surprise or two! (I always add a little something)

I’ve got two more book signings this month – on Saturday, December 14, I’ll be at  Stillwater Books in downtown Pawtucket from 1:00 to 3:00.

And on Saturday, December 21, I’ll be at Ink Fish Books in Warren from 1:00 to 3:00.

Finally, let me say THANK YOU for supporting me since I began this writing journey in 2011. I am very grateful for all of my readers, whether we’ve known each other for decades or you’re someone new who’s recently discovered my books. My personal goal is to write a book each year as long as I’m able to do so. I’m already planning and plotting my next novel!

Wishing you warm blessings, comfort, and good health this holiday season.

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