#AtoZ Dylan – “X” is for MiXed-up Confusion


“All I can do is be me, whoever that is.” ~ Bob Dylan

Dylan young

(Hey, in the A to Z Challenge, sometimes we have to get creative!)

“Mixed-up Confusion,” even though it doesn’t begin with ‘X,’ deserves a place in this series, because it was Dylan’s first released single. He recorded the song in 1962, but it was not included on The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan. A different version of the song was released years later on Dylan’s compilation album Masterpieces.

Click HERE for a link to the song’s lyrics.

I managed to find a good cover of “Mixed-up Confusion” – here again is Zachary Scot Johnson:

 

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#AtoZ Dylan – “W” is for Watching the River Flow


“All I can do is be me, whoever that is.” ~ Bob Dylan

Dylan young

 

Written and recorded in March 1971, “Watching the River Flow” was included on Dylan’s album Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits Vol. II.  Some people have written that the song is about Dylan’s writer’s block (early 70s), whereas others interpret it as simply Dylan not wanting to write political songs.

Click HERE for a link to the song’s lyrics.

The song has been covered by the Earl Scruggs Revue, Colin James, and Leon Russell, but here’s the great Joe Cocker

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#AtoZ Dylan – “V” is for Visions of Johanna


“All I can do is be me, whoever that is.” ~ Bob Dylan

Dylan young

 

“Visions of Johanna” appears on Dylan’s 1966 album Blonde on Blonde. Several critics have acclaimed “Visions of Johanna” as one of Dylan’s highest achievements in writing, praising the allusiveness and subtlety of the language. In 1999, Sir Andrew Motion, poet laureate of the UK, listed it as his candidate for the greatest song lyric ever written. (source: Wikipedia)

Click HERE for a link to the song’s lyrics.

The song has been covered by The Grateful Dead, Marianne Faithfull, Lee Ranaldo, and Chris Smither. Here Robyn Hitchcock introduces “Visions of Johanna” as ‘possibly the greatest song ever written.’ He joins Gillian Welch and Dave Rawlings in Newport in July 2015

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#AtoZ Dylan – “U” is for Unbelievable


“All I can do is be me, whoever that is.” ~ Bob Dylan

Dylan young

“Unbelievable” was recorded and released in 1990, both as a single and as a track on the album Under the Red Sky.

“They said it was the land of milk and honey, now they say it’s the land of money, Whoever thought they could ever make that stick, It’s unbelievable you can get this rich this quick.”

Click HERE for a link to the song’s lyrics.

From what I could determine, there weren’t a lot of covers of this song. It doesn’t matter – this is the one cover – what a version by American soul singer Bettye LaVette:

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#AtoZ Dylan – “T” is for Things Have Changed


“All I can do is be me, whoever that is.” ~ Bob Dylan

Dylan young

Released as a single in 2000, “Things Have Changed” is, besides being one of my favorite later-day Dylan songs, the winner of both the Academy Award for Best Original Song and the Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song. It appeared in the film Wonder Boys. 

“People are crazy and times are strange. I’m locked in tight, I’m out of range. I used to care, but things have changed.”

Click HERE for a link to the song’s lyrics.

There’s nothing like hearing Dylan sing it, but for today, I’m offering Curtis Stigers’s version:

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#AtoZ Dylan – “S” is for Stuck Inside of Mobile with the Memphis Blues Again


“All I can do is be me, whoever that is.” ~ Bob Dylan

Dylan young

“Stuck Inside of Mobile with the Memphis Blues Again” appears on the 1966 album Blonde on Blonde. It was recorded on Columbia’s Music Row in Nashville. The lyrics are fun, they’re very Dylanesque, but rather than trying to find meaning, this is simply a joy to listen to.

Click HERE for a link to the song’s lyrics.

The Grateful Dead covered this song extensively during their live shows, as seen here in this clip from a concert at JFK Stadium in Philadelphia in 1989.

 

#AtoZ Dylan – “R” is for Ring Them Bells


“All I can do is be me, whoever that is.” ~ Bob Dylan

Dylan young

Well, it happened again. A post with no words or music. My apologies – I don’t know why it happened, but it did. I had these A to Z posts written, uploaded, and scheduled well over a month ago, and I had previewed them. So it’s disappointing. But here is “Ring Them Bells.”

“Ring Them Bells” appears on Dylan’s 26th studio album, Oh Mercy, released in September 1989 by Columbia Records. It was hailed by critics, after a string of poorly reviewed albums.

Click HERE for a link to the lyrics.

I found this beautiful rendition by Sarah Jarosz (which made it all the more frustrating when it didn’t post correctly).