#AtoZ 1968 – “G” is for Grenoble

“You’re going to get a concept that maybe this really is one world and why the hell can’t we learn to live together like decent people.” ~ Astronaut Frank Borman, on seeing the entire earth from outer space as he and the crew of the Apollo 8 returned from orbiting the moon.

Jean-Claude Killy and Peggy Fleming, 1968 Winter Olympics

Officially known as the X Olympics Winter Games, the 1968 games were held in Grenoble, France. Thirty-seven countries participated.

Jean-Claude Killy (France) won three gold medals in alpine skiing. Peggy Fleming won the only United States gold medal, in figure skating. Partially due to extensive television coverage, both Killy and Fleming became celebrities.

The 1968 games also marked the first time that the International Olympic Committee ordered drug testing of athletes.

 

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BONUS MUSIC!

Here’s the #62 song from Billboard’s Year-End Top 100 Singles of 1968

“Magic Carpet Ride” by Steppenwolf

 

20 thoughts on “#AtoZ 1968 – “G” is for Grenoble

  1. I remember that green dress so well! Did you know that Peggy’s Mom made it for her? So different from the costumes of today. That dress probably cost Mrs. Fleming about $1.98. I exaggerate of course, but imagine the price of those little outfits today.
    Fleming and Killy, such iconic names from 1968.

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      1. Martha, I just found this; I thought you would enjoy it:

        “Doris had made six dresses that week, including a chartreuse costume with rhinestoned cuffs and neckline. She picked chartreuse after learning that monks in the Grenoble region of France made Chartreuse Liqueur at a nearby monastery. Doris believed that the particular green hue, reminiscent of the herbal liqueur, would subliminally cause French audiences to cheer on her daughter, which would in turn boost Fleming’s confidence.” (from the NBCOlympics website).

        Smart Mom!

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  2. Hi Martha – I remember Killy – he was a real star and a great athlete. But Grenoble is stunning with so much history … cheers Hilary

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