Paris Between the Wars – “M” is for Robert Mallet-Stevens

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Between 1919 and 1939, Paris experienced a cultural and intellectual boom. This blog will feature artists, writers, composers, musicians, and designers. Paris was at its cultural peak.

Robert Mallet-Stevens in 1924

Robert Mallet-Stevens in 1924

One of France’s best interwar architects, Mallet-Stevens was born in Paris in 1886 and died there in 1945. He is widely known for his large villas, and the place to see his work is on the aptly-named Rue Mallet-Stevens in Paris. Here is the entrance to one of his buildings:

Rue-Mallet-Stevens-Martel-studio-entrance-Untapped-Paris

Home designed and built for sculptors Jan and Joel Martel, 1926-1927

Home designed and built for sculptors Jan and Joel Martel, 1926-1927

Mallet-Stevens would be better remembered, perhaps, if not for the fact that he ordered all his work and archives to be burned upon his death.

 

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5 Comments

I didn’t wait for my death to burn stuff. After a court ordered a politician journals to be confiscated during an investigation, I decided to burn all of mine, just in case. Frankly, I think anyone’s personal journals are just that, ‘personal’, no matter what they do for a living.

Now that is a very cool entrance! I’ve always wondered why people have their works burned upon their deaths.

That entrance is fantastic. Too bad he didn’t want to leave his archives behind. How tormented he must have been!

Wow, you can tell that his work was ahead of its time. Fascinating!

Burned upon death!!! Yikes……I’m going to have to read up on this some more!

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