Paris Between the Wars – “A” is for Raymond Asso

A2Z-BADGE 2016-smaller_zpslstazvib
Between 1919 and 1939, Paris experienced a cultural and intellectual boom. This blog will feature artists, writers, composers, musicians, and designers. Paris was at its cultural peak.
Edith Piaf and Raymond Asso
Edith Piaf and Raymond Asso

Born in Nice in 1901, Raymond Asso worked as a French lyricist, without success until he met Edith Piaf in 1935. She became his lover and his muse, providing him with inspiration. As a former French legionnaire, Asso wrote songs such as “Mon Légionnaire” and “Le Fanion de le Légion” (the flag of the legion), both of which became easily identifiable with Piaf.

Here, she sings “Le Fanion de la Légion,” and even though it’s sung in French, Piaf conveys the tone perfectly.

In August 1939, Raymond Asso was called up to serve in the French army during World War II, and his collaborations with Piaf ended. He died in Paris in 1968 at the age of 67.

21 thoughts on “Paris Between the Wars – “A” is for Raymond Asso

  1. Martha; what a great idea for the A-Z blog. As always, I look forward to your writing. So, Edith Piaf; so interesting, so eclectic! Let’s be honest; not the greatest “make out” music, but she does inspire me to march around the living room dusting………with a smile on my face. Keep up the great work! If you’re wondering how I could be so cultured to know Edith and yet so moronic to make such a comment on kissing protocols, I’ll see if I can explain it into a blog!

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  2. Martha, I have to agree with the previous commenters–a fabulous theme! I know I will learn much, as I didn’t know who this gentlemen was. I have some Mireille Matthieu CDs and one of them is of her doing all Edith Piaf songs. Thanks, Denise

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