Smile and Say……”W” is for Wensleydale

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W, X, Y, and Z – yikes!

“W” is for WENSLEYDALE

 

Wensleydale

 

Wensleydale is a mild cheese that has been made in Wensleydale, North Yorkshire since 1150 by Cistercian monks. The monks continued to make the cheese until the dissolution of their monasteries in 1540. Traditionally, sheep’s milk was used, but over the time cow’s milk was also used. The art of making the cheese was passed by the monks to farmers’ wives who produced a blue variety of Wensleydale at their farmhouses. Today, Wensleydale is produced mainly from pasteurized cow’s milk with sheep’s milk added to enhance the flavor.

A Real Yorkshire Wensleydale is creamy-white in color and has a crumbly, flaky texture. The flavor is mild and slightly sweet with hints of wild honey. Wensleydale goes well with fruit pies. Wensleydale cheeses complement fruity white wine such as Pinot Grigio.

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7 Comments

Most of my family is from up north and around the Yorkshire area. I was born in Mansfield in Nottinghamshire.

Oh my goodness. And I mean that. A whole month of writing about cheese – my cholesterol just shot up ten points as I drooled on my keyboard.

It may be fun to have a cheese “eat off” Cow milk, vs sheep milk, vs goat milk!

I haven’t had it yet, either, Lynda, but I’m going out in search of Wensleydale tomorrow!

This is a cheese I’ve been wanting to try for awhile. Our children used to love the “Wallace and Grommet” clay animation shorts, because the main character, Wallace, loved cheese above all else. When he met the supposed girl of his dreams, he was crushed to find that she hated cheese. His incredulous response of, “Not even Wensleydale?” made me want to find out what’s so special about at particular cheese.

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